A Security Checklist for Your Hotel Business

Security issues such as violent attacks and harassment toward your employees or guests, theft and robbery within your facility, and cyberattacks can negatively affect your hotel with consequences that extend well beyond the actual incident. With so many different options for travelers, a hotel’s reputation must remain pristine to attract guests during such a competitive time in the market. Establishing a security program can help you maintain a safe and secure property.
October 25, 2021 | Hotels
By: Leslie S.
Leslie Stoll is a Senior Loss Control Representative working in the Chicagoland area. Leslie joined the Acuity team in January 2020. She specializing in workers’ compensation having come to Acuity from a monoline workers compensation carrier. Leslie also has experience as a multiline carrier loss control representative as well. She is well versed on assessing all lines of coverage in order to help customers identify, evaluate, control and reduce risk with practical solutions and recommendations. Leslie is a Certified Safety Professional (CSP), holds the Associates in Risk Management designation (ARM) from the Insurance Institute of America, and is a graduate of Illinois State University’s Safety Program. Leslie began her career working in private industry (manufacturing) and later transitioned into the insurance industry. Outside of her career, Leslie uses her knowledge of safety and risk assessment to teach women’s self-defense classes at her family’s martial arts school.

Author of Services

Security issues such as violent attacks, harassment, theft and robbery, and computer system cyberattacks can negatively affect your hotel with consequences that extend well beyond the actual incident. With so many different options for travelers, a hotel’s reputation must remain pristine to attract guests during such a competitive time in the market. Establishing a security program can help you maintain a safe and secure property.

 

Below are some strategies to help you build and improve your hotel security program. 

 

General Security Procedures

  • Train employees to contact the police before a situation escalates. This can include but is not limited to concerning activity by guests or the public, a suspicious package/luggage, and threatening phone calls
  • Monitor the property for signs of, graffiti, and take action to correct any undesirable conditions as soon as possible
  • Monitor all doors to make sure they are not left propped open allowing for unauthorized access to your property
  • Maintain landscaping to allow for a clear line of sight from the building to the parking lot
  • Secure roof access to prevent tampering with your heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems 
  • Establish and maintain positive relationships with local law enforcement and request they drive through your parking lots when in the area
  • Give front desk workers the authority to secure the lobby door at any time for guest or employee safety.
  • Install a security panic button within reach of the front desk
  • Provide housekeepers and other employees with personal panic alarms that can alert the front desk of concern
  • Hire a security firm to monitor your property when risk increases beyond your staff’s capabilities.  Such as for sporting events, festivals, conferences, or on-site parties
  • Require that guests present IDs at check-in
  • Require a guest key card to enter the lobby door and all side doors
  • Collect vehicle information from guests to identify unauthorized vehicles on the property
  • Implement visitor restrictions for guest rooms, pools, happy hours, etc.
  • Implement a key management system to track and audit staff member key usage
  • Check credentials of contractors hired to work on the property before giving them access to the property 
  • Add security items to housekeeping’s daily tasks.  This can include verifying that guestroom windows are secure, that self-closing doors function properly, and that emergency numbers are legible
  • Assign housekeepers to work in teams on the same floor; employees working alone are more vulnerable as targets
  • Develop an emergency action plan using Acuity’s online resources 
  • Conduct periodic emergency drills

 

Security Cameras and Lighting

  • Stay up to date with video surveillance systems/equipment
  • Have a documented retention policy for camera footage
  • Check camera coverage at least daily to make sure there are no obstructions to camera views
  • Continually monitor your security cameras for unusual activities
  • Verify that all parking lot lights are functioning and that there are no dark spots in your lot
  • Make sure all entry and exit doors are lighted

 

Theft and Robbery

  • Review the FCC cybercrime planning document
  • Securely dispose of guests' personal information and confidential business information
  • Store cash, checks, and credit card receipts in a time-delay safe until they can be deposited
  • Hire an armored truck transport service to pick up bank drops or vary the time of day that management goes to the bank
  • Conduct periodic audits on your cash handling processes 
  • Restrict safe/vault access to upper management
  • Limit employee access to your hotel management software so employees only have access to information necessary to complete their job duties
  • Pre-screen all potential employees and all contractors and vendors working on your property
By: Leslie S.
Leslie Stoll is a Senior Loss Control Representative working in the Chicagoland area. Leslie joined the Acuity team in January 2020. She specializing in workers’ compensation having come to Acuity from a monoline workers compensation carrier. Leslie also has experience as a multiline carrier loss control representative as well. She is well versed on assessing all lines of coverage in order to help customers identify, evaluate, control and reduce risk with practical solutions and recommendations. Leslie is a Certified Safety Professional (CSP), holds the Associates in Risk Management designation (ARM) from the Insurance Institute of America, and is a graduate of Illinois State University’s Safety Program. Leslie began her career working in private industry (manufacturing) and later transitioned into the insurance industry. Outside of her career, Leslie uses her knowledge of safety and risk assessment to teach women’s self-defense classes at her family’s martial arts school.

Author of Services