3 Tips to Reduce Your Dog Bite Liability as a Property Owner

Dogs are best friends to many. A record number of families have brought dogs home since the beginning of the pandemic. While the increase in companionship is priceless, dog bites and related injuries have also increased. Here are some ways to help prevent being injured by a dog.
September 13, 2021 | Property-owner
By: Leslie S.
Leslie Stoll is a Senior Loss Control Representative working in the Chicagoland area. Leslie joined the Acuity team in January 2020. She specializing in workers’ compensation having come to Acuity from a monoline workers compensation carrier. Leslie also has experience as a multiline carrier loss control representative as well. She is well versed on assessing all lines of coverage in order to help customers identify, evaluate, control and reduce risk with practical solutions and recommendations. Leslie is a Certified Safety Professional (CSP), holds the Associates in Risk Management designation (ARM) from the Insurance Institute of America, and is a graduate of Illinois State University’s Safety Program. Leslie began her career working in private industry (manufacturing) and later transitioned into the insurance industry. Outside of her career, Leslie uses her knowledge of safety and risk assessment to teach women’s self-defense classes at her family’s martial arts school.

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Dogs are best friends to many. A record number of families have brought dogs home since the beginning of the pandemic. While the increase in companionship is priceless, dog bites and related injuries have also increased. Here are some ways to help prevent being injured by a dog.

 

Approaching and petting dogs:

  • Always ask the dog’s guardian for permission to approach a dog
  • Do not approach a dog that is:
    • Sleeping, eating, chewing, on toy or bone, or caring for puppies
    • Growling or barking
    • Not on a leash
    • Unfamiliar with you
  • Approach dogs slowly to avoid startling them
  • Use caution when petting:
    • A dog’s head, face, belly, or feet, as they can be sensitive areas
    • A dog who is behind a fence or in a car, as they may be protective of their space

 

Warning signs a dog may be anxious or afraid:

  • Ears are flattened or up and forward
  • Licking of the lips
  • Showing teeth, growling, or barking
  • Yawning
  • Cowering
  • Tail tucked between legs or straight up
  • Whale eyes (showing a lot of the whites of the eyes)
  • Avoiding eye contact
  • Raised hair on the back of the neck and/or tail

 

 How to help prevent your dog from biting:

  • Spay or neuter your dog
  • Go through dog training
  • Include them in your family, not isolated or left alone for long periods of time
  • When out and about, keep your dog on a leash
  • If your dog shows signs of fear or anxiety, remove them from the situation
  • Reward good behavior with treats
  • Supervise your dog—don’t leave them alone with children or a baby
  • Keep current on regular veterinary care, licensing, and vaccinations

 

Dogs communicate when they are happy and when they are unsure or afraid. Keep these tips in mind next time you encounter a dog to help keep everyone safe.

By: Leslie S.
Leslie Stoll is a Senior Loss Control Representative working in the Chicagoland area. Leslie joined the Acuity team in January 2020. She specializing in workers’ compensation having come to Acuity from a monoline workers compensation carrier. Leslie also has experience as a multiline carrier loss control representative as well. She is well versed on assessing all lines of coverage in order to help customers identify, evaluate, control and reduce risk with practical solutions and recommendations. Leslie is a Certified Safety Professional (CSP), holds the Associates in Risk Management designation (ARM) from the Insurance Institute of America, and is a graduate of Illinois State University’s Safety Program. Leslie began her career working in private industry (manufacturing) and later transitioned into the insurance industry. Outside of her career, Leslie uses her knowledge of safety and risk assessment to teach women’s self-defense classes at her family’s martial arts school.

Author of Services