How Construction Management Software Can Help Your Business
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Posted by John L. on July 19, 2019 in Contractor Focus

If you have ever watched the progress of a large construction project, it is quite amazing to see the steps involved and the coordination it takes from start to finish. You might see contractors excavating the building and site, installing the concrete foundation, erecting structural steel, framing with wood and steel, setting block and brick, and bringing utilities from underneath the street. What you don’t see, however, are all the moving parts behind the scenes—the organization, management, and network of communications that make it all happen.

 

Technology in construction management software has led to significant advancements in project management, including improved accuracy, efficiency and communication. Management software has developed into a system that gives you a centralized hub to connect your people, devices, and applications. With an integrated platform, the engineer in California can collaborate with the architect in Florida and the owner in Texas on the same project in Wisconsin. Being able to bring your entire team on board, including third-party consultants and subcontractors, can help you collaborate anywhere at any time, gaining vital insights for making data-driven decisions and projections while keeping your projects on schedule. 

 

There are many features with construction management software:

 

Financial

  • Estimating, budgeting, and forecasting
  • Contract management
  • Cost management
  • Change management
  • Timecards

Project management

  • Managing documents and drawings
  • Tracking emails
  • Meeting minutes
  • Photos

Field personnel

  • Scheduling
  • Daily logs
  • Inspections
  • Observations
  • Directory
  • Punch list 

 

A comprehensive system can manage all aspects of a construction project from estimating to closeout, keeping the office and field connected and providing real-time updates.

 

Some platforms offer different levels of viewing and interaction with data and people. A company level may allow executives and project managers to manage multiple projects with a high-level view of important data in one spot. A project level view can allow team members to view project-related details and interact with people on specific projects.

There are many great construction management software options to choose from, including some designed by people who work in the industry. If you are in the market, it is important to pick one that is tailored to your company's needs and is easy for your employees to use.

John L. is our Construction guru
I bring over 35 years of experience in the construction industry in both field and office positions to Acuity including carpentry, welding, project management, contract negotiation, and much more. Also, I founded my own commercial general contracting firm specializing in building grocery stores. Over the years I’ve worked closely with architects, civil engineers, and developers. I’ve found it instrumental to build solid relationships with all involved in the construction project, including insurance companies. This is why I am here, I want to help you the contractor better understand insurance and help Acuity to offer products and services that meet your unique needs. I feel a close connection to construction and with my background I feel that I can make sure contractors have a better insurance experience.


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